June: Holiday History & Craft

Father's Day Craft - Holiday History & CraftIf Mother’s Day is in May, guess what holiday we have in June? Father’s Day! Do you know when it became an official holiday in the United States? Do you need a gift idea? Here’s your Holiday History & Craft for June.

(This article and project were prepared for children and it’s written accordingly.)

We’re going to learn about how this holiday began and make a pen or pencil holder. Come join the fun!

 

 

History

President Nixon made Father's Day an official holiday.

President Nixon made Father’s Day an official holiday.

Remember how Anna Jarvis started Mother’s Day? (You can read about it here.) Well, another lady – Grace Golden Clayton – wanted to do something special for her dad. Her dad had passed away and she knew a lot of children had also lost their fathers in a mining accident in her town in West Virginia. So on June 5, 1908, Grace and her friends held a special church service to honor their fathers. This was the first time “Father’s Day” was held in the United States, but unfortunately the idea wasn’t very popular and Grace didn’t try to encourage others to accept the holiday.

But in Washington State, another lady – Sonora Smart – also wanted to honor her father. Throughout her life, Sonora encouraged people to set aside a special day for dads and talked to retailers and lawmakers about the holiday. Different presidents offered support for the national holiday, but it wasn’t until 1972 that President Richard Nixon signed the bill which made Father’s Day an official holiday.

Father’s Day is always the third Sunday in June!

Craft

I made a lot of these for my dad when I was little. It’s a pen or pencil holder for his desk at home or at work. I hope you like this craft! *Adult supervision is recommended*

What You’ll Need:

Father's Day Craft - Holiday History & Craft15 0z. tin can

Craft Sticks (a.k.a. “popsicle sticks”) – I used 36 and had extras left over

Wood paint, any favorite colors

Foam paint brush

Paper plate

Wax paper

Glue (I used hot glue, but normal glue will work too)

Table knives

Rubber bands

Father's Day Craft - Holiday History & CraftDirections:

Begin by emptying and washing out the tin can. (I used peaches…yummy!) Dry the can and set aside. **Be careful the raw edges of the can may be sharp**

Next, layout the wax paper, pour some paint onto the paper plate and start painting those craft sticks. I used three different shades of blue, but you can use any colors you like. Try to think of you dad’s favorite color combinations.

Father's Day Craft - Holiday History & CraftWhen all the craft sticks are painted, left them dry really well. (I left mine overnight.)

 

 

 

 

Father's Day Craft - Holiday History & CraftDecide on your type of glue and prepare to assemble your pencil / pen holder. Lay out the wax paper. Use two table knives to help hold your can in place to reduce its rolling tendency. (See photo) Now begin gluing the painted craft sticks onto the can. Be careful not to extend the stick over the bottom edge because then it won’t stand evenly; cheat any extra to the top.

Make a pattern if you have multiple colors. **If you’re using a glue gun, be VERY careful – I actually burned myself during this project, and it HURTS**

Father's Day Craft - Holiday History & CraftContinue gluing the craft sticks around the can until they meet or over lap. Next, take the rubber bands and place them around the can and sticks; this is especially important if you are using regular glue. Let it dry well, then remove rubber bands.

 

 

 

 

Father's Day Craft - Holiday History & CraftAdd some sharpened pencils or Dad’s favorite pens. Your Father’s Day gift is ready!

 

 

About Sarah Kay Bierle

I’m Sarah Kay Bierle, historian, living history enthusiast, and historical fiction writer. When sharing history, I try to keep the facts interesting and understandable. History is about real people, real actions, real effects and it should inspire us today.
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