Monthly Archives: July 2016

What Happened to General Cornwallis?

“What are some myths that are popular in our views of the American War for Independence?” I asked my brother when I was outlining this series a few months ago. “Well, we think the British soldiers were sort of monster-like. … Continue reading

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1861: “Like A Stonewall”

“There stands Jackson like a stonewall! Rally behind the Virginians. Let us determine to die here, and we will conquer. Follow me.” General Barnard Bee, July 21, 1861

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Stand Aside Yorktown – It Really Ended In 1783

One our “Ideals of Independence” is that the Revolutionary War ended when Cornwallis surrendered to Washington at Yorktown. Right? Well, kind of, sort of. Technically, the war ended two years after Yorktown when the Treaty of Paris was signed. What’s … Continue reading

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1861: “We Did Not Realize Our First Battle Was So Near At Hand”

July 21, 1861 About two o’clock this morning we left “Bush Camp,” and marching down the hill, through Centreville, found the woods obstructed by wagons and troops that had failed to start on time. Soon the Second [Rhode Island Regiment] … Continue reading

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Benedict Arnold: Misunderstood Hero & Bitter Traitor

The name “Benedict Arnold” is synonymous with “traitor” in American History. While there is no excusing Arnold’s treachery and broken oath as an American officer, perhaps we have created such a despicable man that we’ve ignored what he actually did … Continue reading

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1861: “The Slavery Question In This Camp”

June 2, 1861 Yesterday morning three negroes came to the picket-guard and gave themselves up. Upon a separate examination of these men it satisfactorily appeared that they were field hands, owned by one Colonel Mallory, a resident of this neighborhood, … Continue reading

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