8 Things You Should Know About American Lighthouse Keepers

We’ve been talking about lighthouses, their history, lamps and lenses, and even lighthouse poetry, and some very important people haven’t had their own blog post or spotlight time in our series. I’m referring to lighthouse keepers.

In today’s post, I’ve collected eight facts that you should know about American lighthouse keepers in the 19th Century.

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1862: “A Thread Of Red That Looked Like Blood”

Water was what I wanted and I believe, had the whole army been firing at me I would have gotten my canteen filled. Our regiment was going on a run when they crossed this little stream. It was only about a foot from bank to bank, dirty and black by the many feet that had accidentally trod into it. I stopped and scooped out a hole in the mud and put my canteen in to fill it. While doing this, another regiment passed over me and I was cut off from our. I didn’t seem to care. Continue reading

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Women At The Forts

A few weeks ago one of my brothers was watching a John Wayne movie. This particular film had the classic “young officer falls in love with pretty girl” in the plot and highlighted the role of women in Western military forts. (Sort of.)

That got me curious about the real women who lived at military forts during the 19th Century. And a little research revealed a few interesting facts. There were many respectable wives and daughters who journeyed west and lived at or near the military forts where their husbands or fathers served.

Today’s blog post shares five facts about these pioneer women civilizing the west. Continue reading

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Lighthouse Poetry

Written by Celia Thaxter, the daughter of a lighthouse keeper, this poem reflects on the challenges and triumphs of a keeper and his family in a remote location.

We’ll share historical details about American keepers and their families next week, but for today, enjoy a poetic piece. Continue reading

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1862: “I Enclose A Special Order…”

(Second and final blog post published today about the 1862 Maryland Campaign)

Head Qts Banks Corps

Near Frederick Sept 13/62

General

I enclose a Special order of Genl. Lee Commanding Rebel forces – which was found on the field where my corps is encamped. Continue reading

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1862: “Attainment Of An Honorable Peace”

(One of two posts published on September 11, 2017)

Headquarters, Near Frederickstown, Maryland

September 8, 1862

Mr. President:

The present posture of affairs, in my opinion, places it in the power of the Government of the Confederate States to propose with propriety to that of the United States the recognition of our independence.

For more than a year both sections of the country have been devastated by hostilities which have brought sorrow and suffering upon thousands of homes, without advancing the objects which our enemies propose to themselves in beginning the contest. Continue reading

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