No Reconstruction Today Because…

I’m at The Huntington Research Library this week and didn’t quite get my Reconstruction Era report ready before I disappeared into the archives.

Rest assured this week’s Reconstruction history post will appear over the weekend or as a double post Friday next week. It will be a book review on a fascinating saga that a blog reader recommended to me.

And now, I’ve got to go. Lunch break is almost over and I will finish reading an original  1864 pocket journal and take a look at some “missing ” battle reports for a colleague at Emerging Civil War.

I can’t take photos inside the library, but here’s my view from lunch.

Lighthouse Gardens

After a few days of this creative hauling, the garden boxes and barrels were filled and ready for planting, and the following afternoon, Mama put on her straw hat and invited us to help her in the garden. While Marian sat on a small quilt nearby, Jacob, Paul, and I poked the seeds into the warm earth. The vegetables were planted in the boxes and in two of the barrels. Two other barrels got flower seeds, and Mama had had the men move the last two barrels to the front of the lighthouse – facing the sea – and we planted the prettiest flowers there. Continue reading

Moby-Dick: The Truth Behind The Legend

“Call me Ishmael.” It’s the opening line of a novel about the whaling industry, about revenge, and about redemption.

If you’re interested in the 19th Century American whaling industry, love classic American literature, or believe you were tortured in your high-school literature class, you’ve probably read Herman Melville’s novel Moby Dick. The novel has certainly shaped American views of whaling in the 1800’s. And if you’ve read, perhaps you’ve wondered: could it be true?

Today we’re wrapping up our three month examination of American whaling (moving on to lighthouses in July!) and we’re revealing some historical facts about this Melville novel,  the real account that inspired the story, and a recommendation for your summer reading list. Continue reading

The Earliest American Whaling

The earliest American whaling on the east coast. Let’s be sure to clarify the location!

This month Gazette665’s Wednesday blog posts will continue to explore whaling in 19th Century maritime, and we’ll be tracing some of the developments and communities surrounding the industry. To start understanding the complex picture, today we’ll journey back to the foundations of American whaling – back to the 1600 and 1700’s and delve into the early attempts which laid the ground work for the late 18th and early 19th Century’s activities. Continue reading

Actium: Transforming A Republic To An Empire

As we’ve seen in our series “With Spears & Shields,” ancient battles could have far reaching effects for empires, civilizations, and ideologies. We’ve looked at empires or countries fighting each other for territory, glory, revenge, and conquest.

What if a battle was fought between soldiers of the same country? That’s right: civil war. And what if that battle decisively crushed one opposition? What if that battle significantly changed the course of a nation and even its form of government? The stakes were high for Rome and Mediterranean World at Actuim when Marcus Antonius and Cleopatra battled Octavian in the final major battle of Rome’s Republic Days. Continue reading

Searching For Hunter McGuire

I’m pleased to share my newest article published by Emerging Civil War blog. Here’s the link to An Elusive Doctor At Gettysburg.

This was a fun article to write since it draws information from my research on the medical situation at Gettysburg and the McGuire Family.

Again, here’s the link – An Elusive Doctor At Gettysburg

Your Historian,

Miss Sarah

P.S. Go ahead and leave any comments or questions on Emerging Civil War, and I’d highly recommend following ECW!