10 Things To Know About Harriet Quimby

Harriet Quimby, the year she got her pilot certificate

It’s the first Friday or September already? That means it’s time to start our new historical theme of the month. And I will try to make sure @Gazette665 has more social media this month. When finishing a manuscript that has a deadline some things are let go…

This month we’ll be featuring ten aviation pioneers and ten things you should know about them! We’ll start with Harriet Quimby who accomplished a major aviation and women’s history milestone.

Here are the top ten things you should know about Miss Harriet Quimby… Continue reading

“Annie Get Your Gun”

Once upon a time, I received tickets to a community theater to see Annie Get Your Gun for my birthday. Purposely, I didn’t research the history about Annie Oakley because I wanted to thoroughly enjoy it and not sit there thinking “that’s not the way it really happened.” (The curse of being a researcher…)

But there is some historical truth that inspired the stage productions, so here are some details.

Warning… Spoilers ahead! Continue reading

“The King & I”

Gazette665’s theme of the month for Friday blog posts in August 2018 is History On Broadway: A New Look At Musicals. Ever wondered if there was historical fact and truth behind some of Broadway greatest musicals?

I’m looking forward to sharing some of my favorite musicals with you and uncovering some of the real history behind the fabulous entertainment. Today, we’ll feature the Roger and Hammerstein musical The King and I.

Warning… Spoilers ahead! Continue reading

10 Things You Should Know About Berengaria of Navarre

If history books mention this queen at all, it’s often only to repeat the legend with a little truth that she was Queen of England, but never set foot on English soil. How did that happen? Or did it?

Read on to discover ten important facts about this remarkable woman, the legends and shadows of her history, and the known details of her life and brief reign as England’s “unseen” queen. Continue reading

1863: “Learn To Know The Hearts Of My Abused And Suffering People!”

Alexandria, March 18.

Since I last wrote to you, the condition of the poor refugees has improved. During the winter months, the small pox carried them off by hundreds; but now it has somewhat abated. At present, we have one hundred and forty patients in the hospital. The misery I have witness must be seen to be believed. The Quakers of Philadelphia, who sent me here, have done nobly for my people. They have indeed proved themselves a Society of Friends. Had it not been for their timely relief, many more must have died. They have sent thousands and tens of thousands of dollars to different sections of the country, wherever these poor sufferers came within our lines. But, notwithstanding all that has been done, very many have died from destitution. It is impossible to reach them all. Government has erected here barracks for the accommodations of five hundred. We have fifteen hundred on the list. Continue reading

Women and 19th Century Literature

If a person knows how to write, they will write something. A shopping list, letter, journal, recipe, book, novel, thesis paper. Through the centuries, women had written, but they didn’t always receive much attention or much help from publishers. In mid-19th Century America, a change started to occur in attitudes toward women, writing, and publishing. Against this backdrop, fictional character Susan Rose Arnold scribbles poetry, wonders if someday it could be published, and meets a woman who regularly writes for publications.

“Miss Shermann,” I said as I guided her up to her room after the evening meal, “what do you write? If you don’t mind my question.” She had perfect manners and the most fascinating way of controlling the conversation at the table, without seeming to be in charge.

“It depends,” she replied, smiling. “Sometimes short stories. Sometimes information about travel or the impracticality of these beautiful ladies’ fashions. Anything I can sell to a newspaper or magazine.” (Lighthouse Loyalty, Chapter 18)

Today, we’ll highlight some mid-19th Century female authors and the changing world of publishing.  Continue reading