1862: “I Am Sick & Tired Of The Whole Business”

November 8, 1862

…I am glad to do McClellan this justice [grateful for promotion], because altho’ I do not think he has treated me altogether as well as I had a right to expect yet I am thankful for what he has done, & wish to give him all the credit that is due particularly as to day the order has been received relieving him from duty with this Army & placing Burnside in command. Continue reading

1862: “There Are About 450 Men With Our Regiment Now”

Near Snickers Gap, Va.

Wednesday Nov 5th, 1862

Dear Sister

I received your letter of Oct 26th last Saturday and now will try to answer it. I received a letter from Anne last Thursday. I will try to answer it soon. Last Thursday night we left our camp at Antietam about 7 o’clock and marched about 3 hours over hills that would make Charleston Hill feel ashamed of itself, and camped down till morning. Friday we passed through Harpers Ferry. Saturday we lay in camp and Sunday, while you were going to meeting wrapped in thick shawls and furs, we were sweating on the march, but since then it has been cooler. There was quite a frost this morning. I expect you have had some snow by this time and considerable ice. Continue reading

1862: “The People Are All Very Kind”

November 2, 1862

I am in most magnificent health, growing fatter every day. I went today with the Gen. & rest to the Episcopal Church in Berryville. Mr. Luter preached a very good sermon and the girls all were dressed in their best and looked pretty, the music was good and altogether I enjoyed it highly. And then there was such a glorious dinner for us here [in camp] when we got back, thanks to the good people of Clarke & Jefferson [counties], that I passed really a delightful day, “at charity with myself and all mankind,” which frame of mind I find a good dinner conducive to. I saw Ned Lee at church, and his health seems to be much better now. Continue reading

1862: “You Could Scarcely Believe The Number Of Wounded”

October 23, 1862 

…You could scarcely believe the number of wounded that have passed through & remained in Winchester since the Sharpsburg battle. Many, Many sick are dying here, I fear to say how many were buried today. The ladies are active in doing what they can…. My darling Bev is in town & has a miserable cold, but is not laid up. His location is not yet decided on. He will report to the proper person the day after tomorrow I expect, & then I shall know where he will be, & what he will have to do, dear Boy! The last of my younger children, & my heart is unspeakably anxious about him. Pray for him, my precious Child & for your old Cousin too, pray that I may be benefitted by sorrow, & more ready for my Heavenly Home. Continue reading

1862: “If We Could Only Be At Home Together Once More…”

Richmond. VA

October 10th 1862

My dear Brothers.

I need scarcely tell you with what ardent love and interest our hearts have followed you during all this long period when you have been so constantly exposed to such danger, hardships, and privation. We have written you whenever there seemed a possibility of letters reaching you, but I suppose very few, if any, of the letters arrived safely. Continue reading