1862: “A Thread Of Red That Looked Like Blood”

Water was what I wanted and I believe, had the whole army been firing at me I would have gotten my canteen filled. Our regiment was going on a run when they crossed this little stream. It was only about a foot from bank to bank, dirty and black by the many feet that had accidentally trod into it. I stopped and scooped out a hole in the mud and put my canteen in to fill it. While doing this, another regiment passed over me and I was cut off from our. I didn’t seem to care. Continue reading

1862: “Personal Wish That All Men Everywhere Could Be Free”

Executive Mansion

Washington, August 22, 1862.

Hon. Horace Greely:

Dear Sir

I have just read yours of the 19th address to myself through the New-York Tribune. If there be in it any statements, or assumptions of fact, which I may know to be erroneous, I do not, now and here, controvert them. If there be in it any inferences which I may believe to be falsely drawn, I do not now and here, argue against them. If there be perceptible in it an impatient and dictatorial tone, I waive it in deference to an old friend, whose heart I have always supposed to be right.

As to the policy I “seem to pursuing” as you say, I have not meant to leave any one in doubt. Continue reading

1862: “Treated As Outlaws”

WAR DEPT., ADIT. AND INSP. GENERAL’S OFFICE,

GENERAL ORDERS, NO. 60

Richmond, August 21, 1862

  1. Whereas, Major-General Hunter, recently in command of the enemy’s forces on the coast of South Carolina, and Brigadier-General Phelps, a military commander in the State of Louisiana, have organized and armed negro slaves for military service against their masters, citizens of this Confederacy; and whereas, the Government of the United States has refused to answer an inquiry whether said conduct of its officers has met its sanction, and has thus left to this Government no other means of repressing said crimes and outrages than the adoption of such measure of retaliation as shall serve to prevent their repetition:

Continue reading

1862: “Gradual Abolishment Of Slavery”

1862_-in-their-words

March 6, 1862

Fellow-citizens of the Senate, and House of Representatives,

I recommend the adoption of a Join Resolution by your honorable bodies which shall be substantially as follows:

“Resolved that the United States ought to co-operate with any state which may adopt gradual abolishment of slavery, giving to such state pecuniary aid, to be used by such state in it’s discretion, to compensate for the inconveniences public and private, produced by such change of system.” Continue reading

1861: “Modify That Paragraph So As To Conform”

Gazette665 Blog Series 1861: In Their Words

Washington D.C. Sept. 2, 1861.

Private and confidential.

Major General Fremont:

My dear Sir: Two points in your proclamation of August 30th give me some anxiety. First should you shoot a man, according to the proclamation the Confederates would very certainly shoot our best man in their hands in retailiation; and so, man for man, indefinitely. It is therefore my order that you allow no man to be shot, under the proclamation, without first having my approbation or consent. Continue reading