1862: “Attainment Of An Honorable Peace”

(One of two posts published on September 11, 2017)

Headquarters, Near Frederickstown, Maryland

September 8, 1862

Mr. President:

The present posture of affairs, in my opinion, places it in the power of the Government of the Confederate States to propose with propriety to that of the United States the recognition of our independence.

For more than a year both sections of the country have been devastated by hostilities which have brought sorrow and suffering upon thousands of homes, without advancing the objects which our enemies propose to themselves in beginning the contest. Continue reading

Something Different This Friday: Blog Posts About Traveling

This week has been a little crazy with an editing/writing project. (Details coming later!) So…unfortunately, I don’t have the blog post series for the Fridays in October started.

However, I thought I’d share two blog posts I’ve recently written for Emerging Civil War. This summer I did some traveling and research in Virginia and Maryland, and these are two wonderful places I was able to visit. Photos and article links are listed below. Continue reading

Maryland, My Maryland (ECW guest posts)

Baltimore Riots in 1861 set the stage for Maryland's Civil War

Baltimore Riots in 1861 set the stage for Maryland’s Civil War

This week a blog series written by yours truly was published on Emerging Civil War.

The series introducing the internal conflict experienced in the state of Maryland during the American Civil War. I enjoyed the opportunity to introduce this subject and share stories of two young people who were directly affected by the struggle.

Here are all the links “Maryland, My Maryland”:

Maryland, My Maryland, Part 1 – introduces Maryland’s role as a border state during the Civil War

Maryland, My Maryland, Part 2 – follow a young Marylander who chose to fight for the Confederacy and what happened to his family as a result of his decision

Maryland, My Maryland, Part 3 – meet Miss Eupehmia Goldsborough whose charity and Southern sympathies exiled her from her home state.

Your Historian,

Miss Sarah

P.S. You are welcome to leave comments and questions on ECW. I will be happy to answer them!