Dead Confederates At Gettysburg

A writer is suppose to explain things. But I didn’t fully explain something important in Blue, Gray & Crimson. Before you send me to “bad writer’s prison”, let me explain. The story is from an 1863 point of view, and the Westmore family can’t see into the future. Don’t remember the section I’m referring to? Here it is:

“What about Confederate soldiers’ graves?” Mother wondered aloud.

“Someone told me the Confederate graves are left untouched,” Father admitted. “If a Confederate soldier is exhumed by mistake, they rebury him there, not in the new cemetery. I don’t know what will happen to their graves.” (Blue, Gray & Crimson: A Story of Civilian Courage at Gettysburg, page 298)

So what actually happened to the graves of Confederate soldiers buried at Gettysburg? Now, since I’m writing blog posts in modern times, I can tell you. Continue reading

“Stonewall” Jackson’s Photograph

Stonewall_Jackson1862Here’s a guest post I wrote for Emerging Civil War. It explores the location and situation surrounding the first photograph during the Civil War years.

“There were only two photos of General “Stonewall” Jackson taken during the war. One photograph was made during April 1863, shortly before his final battle at Chancellorsville and shows the general in profile, looking quiet and stern. The first wartime photograph was taken during the late autumn of 1862 in Winchester, Virginia; it was the favorite of Mrs. Jackson and was called “the official photograph” by military staff officers. The Winchester photograph was produced under unique circumstances, some of which are evident in the image. The town where it was taken, the young woman who asked for it, and a crooked button reveal much of the “Stonewall” story in a single photograph.” READ THE COMPLETE ARTCLE

Your Historian,

Miss Sarah

Christmas in July!

I’ve always wanted to host a Civil War Christmas educational event, but December always gets so crazy busy. This year McGuire Home Winchester, Virginia, Civil War Living History hosted “Christmas in July” – a tea and educational event.

We had a lot of fun decorating the room with items which might have been used in a Civil War Christmas celebration.

The dramatic presentation “Christmas in Winchester” took our guests through five Christmases at the McGuire Home (1861-1865) and emphasized the importance of courage and family love.

Here’s a few photos of the event – and Happy Christmas (in July)!

Click on a photo to view the gallery in full-screen mode.

 

 

Gods & Generals Christmas Scene

Here’s Part 2 of your Christmas gift from Gazette665! (Part 1 can be found here.)

For all you folks interested in the American Civil War, I had to share this clip from the movie “Gods and Generals.”  This is probably one of the most memorable scenes of the whole film; a battle weary general and a darling little girl talking about Christmas and their hopes.

Merry Christmas!

Your Historian,

Miss Sarah

Photos From Moorpark Civil War Re-enactment 2014 (Part 2)

Here are the promised photos of “The McGuire Home, Winchester, Virginia” at the Moorpark Civil War Re-enactment 2014. For re-enactment military photos from this event, click here.

We had a great time at this event. Our camping location was superb and we were able to share history, answer questions, and interact with a lot of spectators and students. Thank you to the Moorpark Rotary Club for hosting another wonderful weekend.

There were new display items featured at our “home.” We had a box of supplies and Christmas gifts which we were preparing to “send” to our McGuire family members with the army. I think people enjoyed seeing the simple, practical, hand-made gifts, and it was a nice teaching tool when talking about the historical family members and what they did during the war. (If you want historical information about the McGuire Family, please use this link.)

I took 75 Christmas cards to the event and invited re-enactors to sign them for US troops stationed oversees. The project was a great success! And many thanks to the chaplains, officers, and other re-enactors for their help and support.

Enjoy the photos! (You can click on one photo and view all of them as a gallery).

An exciting news update on my research of the McGuire family! Earlier this week I found a portrait of Captain Hugh H. McGuire who was in the 11th Virginia Cavalry. Maybe I’ll write a special post about Captain McGuire at a later time.

Your Historian,

Miss Sarah

P.S. Which is your favorite photo? Do you have questions about the weekend, our living history scenario, or the new display items? Share your thoughts in a comment.

And don’t forget…tomorrow (Friday) is Part 2 in Shakespeare’s Historical Fiction.

 

3 Days ‘Til Moorpark 2014

This video was filmed at a Civil War Re-enactment in Pennsylvania…  If you’re on the west coast of the US and thinking “I would’ve loved to go, but couldn’t make it to Pennsylvania”, fear not.

MOORPARK CIVIL WAR RE-ENACTMENT 2014 starts in 3 days and is the largest Civil War event west of the Mississippi River. Here’s a link with lots of information. (And remember: the event’s at a new location this year, so check for the new address.)

“McGuire Home, Winchester, Virginia,” Civil War Living History Group is attending this event. (Yeah, I need to go finish ironing about 15 yards of calico skirts…). We have some new display items and will be packing a Christmas box for the McGuire men who are with the Confederate military…can you guess some of the practical items we’ve accumulated? (I’ll post some photos of the display and event next week, in case you’re not attending).

Check out the new Living History pages. And if you’re attending this event or another Civil War re-enactment you may find this page (and the Student Questions) helpful!

Your Historian,

Miss Sarah

P.S. Oh, by the way, the video clip is supposed to portray the Battle of Fairfield (July 3, 1863). Captain Hugh McGuire of the 11th Virginia Cavalry fought there.